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Seems our smartfones aren’t quite protected (chg’d to appease those that can speel ot type)

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
8,771
Location
here nc
IN 2018, 23-YEAR-OLD Jorge Molina was arrested and jailed for six days on suspicion of killing another man. Police in Avondale, Arizona, about 20 miles from Phoenix, held Molina for questioning. According to a police report, officers told him they knew “one hundred percent, without a doubt” his phone was at the scene of the crime, based on data from Google.

He’d simply lent an old phone to the man police later arrested. The phone was still signed into his Google account.

The information about Molina’s phone came from a geofence warrant, a relatively new and increasingly popular investigative technique police use to track suspects’ locations.

Geofence warrants work in reverse: Police start with a time and location, and request data from Google or another tech company about the devices in the area at the time. The companies then typically supply anonymous data on the devices in the area. Police use their own investigative tools to narrow down this list. Then they may ask for more specific information—often an email address or a name of the account holder—for a phone on the narrower list.

Critics say the process is an invasion of privacy, often subjecting many people to an unconstitutional search. Now, in a rare step, two judges have denied requests for geofence warrants and questioned whether they complied with Fourth Amendment protections for searches. Lawmakers and activists see the court opinions as steps toward a potential ban on the practice.

“This is as clear as day a fishing expedition that violates people's basic constitutional rights,” says New York state assemblymember Dan Quart.

Though relatively new, the practice is becoming increasingly common. Google reported a 1,500 percent increase in requests in 2018 compared with 2017. The New York Times reported the company received as many as 180 requests per week last year. Privacy experts tell WIRED that it isn't just Google. Apple, Uber, and Snapchat have all received similar requests.
 

color of law

Accomplished Advocate
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
5,381
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
A "general warrant" for a search is one which fails to sufficiently specify place or person to be searched or things to be seized and is illegal under Fourth Amendment as authorizing random or blanket search at the discretion of police.

General warrants are unconstitutional. Remember the search for Dzhokhar, the Boston bomber; where the cops went from house to house searching for the animal. and no one was held accountable.
 

CJ4wd

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2017
Messages
278
Location
Planet Earth
Considering the information in the OP, I wonder how long it might be before we see "goose-steppers" on our streets?
 

Doug_Nightmare

Active member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
557
84 of (roughly) 170 currently sovereign states use the goose step. George Orwell commented in 1941 that the goose step was used only in countries where the population was too scared to laugh at their military.

Interestingly the British Army’s exaggerated arm swing performs the same function as Stechschritt originally did, allow more precise alignment of troops in mass frontal assault.

George Orwell was brilliant in his prediction of our current predicament. Nineteen Eighty-Four predated Alexandr Solzhenitsyn’s Gulag Archipelago by a decade, apparently offering a handbook to the GULAG, Glavnoe upravlenie lagerei, Главное управление лагерей, 'Main Directorate of Camps'
 
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solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
8,771
Location
here nc
84 of (roughly) 170 currently sovereign states use the goose step. George Orwell commented in 1941 that the goose step was used only in countries where the population was too scared to laugh at their military.

Interestingly the British Army’s exaggerated arm swing performs the same function as Stechschritt originally did, allow more precise alignment of troops in mass frontal assault.

George Orwell was brilliant in his prediction of our current predicament. Nineteen Eighty-Four predated Alexandr Solzhenitsyn’s Gulag Archipelago by a decade, apparently offering a handbook to the GULAG, Glavnoe upravlenie lagerei, Главное управление лагерей, 'Main Directorate of Camps'
so glad dougie to see you’re caught up have climbed on the same Orwell platform that this member has been on all the while discussing Orwell’s attributes from 1984 on this august forum’s membership since, Jan 2017 as noted here

tho...are you truly sure it was a prediction per se...hummmm?
 

Doug_Nightmare

Active member
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
557
From Solus Ipse, Pig Greek. Dog Boy spoke Ancient Greek.

Apropos, RBG‘s demise caused me to connect Xanthippe, a name that didn’t mean much to me, to Socrates as his wife termagant. There is a woodcut of Xanthippe dumping a chamberpot on Socrates’ head. So, RGB, Xanthippe termagant to the Court.
 

Logan 5

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
681
Location
Utah
Chamberpot? I have two chamberpots from the early 19th. century. Today most would use a 5 gal. bucket. Have one of those too.
Interesting that you collect "chamberpots". Good name for them as I'm sure your co-workers may not feel "relieved" to find that you collect porta-potties....
 

Logan 5

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
681
Location
Utah
Dude, for four years I was using a 5 gallon bucket in my outhouse. Anywhere from +110*F (this summer) to -27*F (a couple winters ago). Didn't faze me in the least bit.
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
8,771
Location
here nc
Dude, for four years I was using a 5 gallon bucket in my outhouse. Anywhere from +110*F (this summer) to -27*F (a couple winters ago). Didn't faze me in the least bit.
gotta be tough w/them their sears/j.c.penny catalogues isn’t it...
[horrors 😱😱😱...don’t tell us you use your left hand to wipe and rinse your hend in the other 5 gallon bucket of non- portable h20?]
 
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