• We are now running on a new, and hopefully much-improved, server. In addition we are also on new forum software. Any move entails a lot of technical details and I suspect we will encounter a few issues as the new server goes live. Please be patient with us. It will be worth it! :) Please help by posting all issues here.
  • The forum will be down for about an hour this weekend for maintenance. I apologize for the inconvenience.
  • If you are having trouble seeing the forum then you may need to clear your browser's DNS cache. Click here for instructions on how to do that
  • Please review the Forum Rules frequently as we are constantly trying to improve the forum for our members and visitors.

How can I legally protect my gun while open carrying in rain/snow?

Citizen

Founder's Club Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
18,283
Location
Fairfax Co., VA
SNIP As long as the heat does not go so far as to change temper on springs...
Makes a lot of sense. I formerly enjoyed a muzzle-loader. Boiling water was the cleaning solvent. Any water except solid woulda worked, but very hot water was used because the metal heated up which dried off the water film quickly.

Its funny. Too much heat reduces the temper of metal. Whereas alcohol definitely reduces my temper, as in, I don't have a temper when alcoholated--can't get mad.
 
Last edited:

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,912
Location
North Carolina
<<DISCLAIMER>> You plastic gun owners NEVER heat your gun above the temperature of a very hot day, NEVER. And never put your gun in very hot water or hot oil. The plastic will warp! I keep forgetting some of you folks own plastic guns. And the same goes for wood or plastic grips.
 
Last edited:

MKEgal

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2010
Messages
4,387
Location
in front of my computer, WI
WalkingWolf said:
As long as there are no plastic parts acetone (nail polish remover) would be better.
Last time I got my pistols back from the PD, they had silver marker all over - barrel, frame, slide.
I ended up using acetone, & while I'm sure it got onto the various plastic parts (had to remove the marker) they showed no damage.
I was worried at first about the metal finish, until someone showed me to just rub a little oil over it.
Felt kinda silly... they are Glocks, after all. Not much can harm them.


ETA: to answer the OP, a clear plastic bag would work, & I don't see how anyone could claim it was concealing the pistol. How about a clear kydex holster? (Do they even make clear kydex, or a similarly hard but formable plastic?)
 
Last edited:

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,912
Location
North Carolina
Last time I got my pistols back from the PD, they had silver marker all over - barrel, frame, slide.
I ended up using acetone, & while I'm sure it got onto the various plastic parts (had to remove the marker) they showed no damage.
I was worried at first about the metal finish, until someone showed me to just rub a little oil over it.
Felt kinda silly... they are Glocks, after all. Not much can harm them.


ETA: to answer the OP, a clear plastic bag would work, & I don't see how anyone could claim it was concealing the pistol. How about a clear kydex holster? (Do they even make clear kydex, or a similarly hard but formable plastic?)
Yes, you can buy lucite at the hardware store, it should form with heat just like kydex. It is much thicker than kydex and would be heavy. I just never worried about my guns getting wet in the weather, even black powder firearms. Now falling in water like I did Sunday is a different story for guns with percussion caps. As far as the acetone it seems only to affect certain types of plastic, it does come in a plastic bottle(nail polish remover).

I am glad they used something that could be removed as to scratching it up with a scribe.
 

marshaul

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Aug 13, 2007
Messages
11,200
Location
Fairfax County, Virginia
Isopropanol is 1% water so when the alcohol is gone there still is the same problem. I use alcohol for cleaning, same as acetone, I would not use alcohol in any area confined especially with springs. To get moisture from those areas I use heat, and a lube that once the moisture is cooked off it will seal the metal. As long as the heat does not go so far as to change temper on springs, and the metal needs to be heated to changing colors to do that, it is safe. Water turns to gas at a safe level to immerse wet parts into cooking oil, preferably old. Water gone, metal pores absorb oil, parts come out slick as snot. Unless I am trying to patina a BP handgun, once cleaned with hot soapy water and dried off the parts go into old cooking oil, at around 250.

The reason for old cooking oil is the oil has carbon from food and that carbon ends up in the pores of the steel. But then that is my theory, I have no way to prove it.
False. The 1% water in 99% isopropanol is so diluted that it evaporates with the alcohol. This is why 99% isopropanol is used as a water displacer in electronics applications (my field).

This is because, as the alcohol evaporates, the water has such a high effective surface area/mass ratio (it's so spread out) that it evaporates at a rate similar to the isopropanol itself.

As for alcohol remaining in the corners, A: WD40 does the same thing, only it leaves your corners gummy, B: grab a hairdryer, wait 30 seconds. Done.
 
Last edited:
Top