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Was told to leave Wal-Mart today.

KBCraig

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
4,833
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Granite State of Mind
BTW, some police departments require college degrees, so I don't recommend impugning the education level of cops. Many are quite educated.
Even small town reserve cops typically have Associate's degrees, and in cities it's not unusual to find patrolmen with Master's degrees.

The problem is, those degrees tend to be in Criminal Justice or Government, which amounts to "Vo-Tech for Police Officers". As you say, they rely on the mythology they're taught, not the actual law.

It's not unlike any other specialty degree program. A degree in Education teaches navigation of the profession, not how to teach, and certainly not mastery of any particular subject matter. The same is true for Criminal Justice degrees.
 

eye95

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
13,525
Location
Fairborn, Ohio, USA
Even small town reserve cops typically have Associate's degrees, and in cities it's not unusual to find patrolmen with Master's degrees.

The problem is, those degrees tend to be in Criminal Justice or Government, which amounts to "Vo-Tech for Police Officers". As you say, they rely on the mythology they're taught, not the actual law.

It's not unlike any other specialty degree program. A degree in Education teaches navigation of the profession, not how to teach, and certainly not mastery of any particular subject matter. The same is true for Criminal Justice degrees.

I have an education degree in math. I had to take all the same math courses as any other undergrad in math plus the education courses. Not much room was left for electives and I had to take the equivalent of about five years worth of credits to get my four-year degree, more than a math degree would have required.

My experience may not be the norm, but every individual is unique--and that was more or less the point of my post. The norm for cops may be not to have a four-year degree, but for a certain poster to imply that cops only have HS educations is the precise kind of generalization that we should avoid. It is an indication of a bigotry that we should eschew.
 

palerider116

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Joined
Nov 14, 2010
Messages
572
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Unknown
Criminal justice, sociology, psychology, and public administration are the common ones.

I'm an oddball with a management undergraduate degree and will complete my masters in management soon.

The education is sometimes problematic but normally it is a fault in the logical thinking / deductive reasoning skills. Rote knowledge does not promote either one.
 

Z1P2

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
85
Location
Corryton
Send an EECB, tell them the time of day and store you were at, describe the situation. If they care enough to check on what happened, they have the ability to remotely connect to the store's security cameras and view the footage from that date and time as long as it's within 30 days. They can then inform the district manager and forward recorded footage to him to disipline or fire the employee or manager. And next time, don't bother with checking out, leave your card with goods in place and just walk out.
 

davidmcbeth

Banned
Joined
Jan 14, 2012
Messages
16,169
Location
earth's crust
I have an education degree in math. I had to take all the same math courses as any other undergrad in math plus the education courses.

I took a ed math course when finishing up my BS in Science... it was funny seeing other students trying to figure stuff out ... and when they asked me for an equation for something I would not just tell them .. I would derive it from scratch using actual math skills...they would say "how did you do that" and I say "that's math ladies". They were all impressed with my bulging math skills.

My next class was thermodynamics .... glad I took that ed math course, it helped me out in that class hahahahaha ... ;)

I found I was 1 course short of graduating and took the educational math course for the easy credit. Easy A. Never studied but I did go to class; hey I signed up for it.

Of course our kids think we are all stupid 'cause we be old and creaky ... now my kid is taking diffy Q and he's com'in to Mr. Stupid for help. Hahahaha. My brain hurts. I look at his stuff and say "hey! the 5th differential of that is zero!" :monkey


Math: the only subject where you can always prove the teacher wrong ..
 
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