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Traveling cross country while open carrying.

mnrobitaille

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Kahlotus, WA
Starting Friday, August 20 until I get back home, I'll be traveling from Washington State to Wisconsin. I'll be traveling through the following states: Washington (have current CPL), Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Iowa, & Wisconsin. Through research, I've found that Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, & South Dakota are all true Constitutional Carry states (allows residents & non-residents alike to carry), while both Iowa & Wisconsin have reciprocity with Washington State.

Is there something that I am missing?

Please do not say use apps like USCCA, LegalHeat, or ConcealedCarry.com, as already have those apps. I am looking for boots on the ground experience.
 

mnrobitaille

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Kahlotus, WA
When was the last time someone heard of an apartment complex that, as part of rent/lease agreement, disallows the open carry of firearms?

Ex's apartment is exactly that.
 

mnrobitaille

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That may apply to the "common areas" of the property and not the units themselves.
Yeah it does apply to all the "common areas", so therein lies a problem of how does one go from apartment to vehicle while wanting to carry?

What happened to the McDonald v. Chicago decision wherein the judiciary claimed that the Civil Rights Act of 1866 protected the right to keep and bear arms as a “civil right.”?
 

color of law

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When was the last time someone heard of an apartment complex that, as part of rent/lease agreement, disallows the open carry of firearms?

Ex's apartment is exactly that.
But they are not disallowing conceal carry. It would be different if they denied the possession of firearms in the renters apartment, meaning no firearms on their property all together.
 

JTHunter2

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Planet Earth
By that line of thinking then, a bakery or florist should not be forced to provide goods/services to Same sex unionships/marriages as they are private property (although open to the public).
That is the difference between "living quarters" (i.e., residential) and a business that provides a service. OC in "common areas" is basically to avoid "panic attacks" by the "sheeple".
"Out of sight - out of mind." You can OC inside the aprtment. Just don't panic the wussies.
 

mnrobitaille

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Kahlotus, WA
That is the difference between "living quarters" (i.e., residential) and a business that provides a service. OC in "common areas" is basically to avoid "panic attacks" by the "sheeple".
"Out of sight - out of mind." You can OC inside the aprtment. Just don't panic the wussies.
So they are allowed to violate civil rights then? The landlord of the apartment complex has a business license, & is providing a service.
 

KBCraig

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So they are allowed to violate civil rights then? The landlord of the apartment complex has a business license, & is providing a service.
No.

YOU are not allowed to violate the property owner's rights.

If you want to do whatever you want on the property, then buy it. As long as someone else owns it, you play by their rules or you don't go at all.
 

color of law

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No.

YOU are not allowed to violate the property owner's rights.

If you want to do whatever you want on the property, then buy it. As long as someone else owns it, you play by their rules or you don't go at all.
I must disagree. I suggest you read McDonald v. City of Chicago, Ill., 561 US 742 - Supreme Court 2010. McDonald explains the 2A is a civil right and is actually contained in the Fourteenth Amendment.
 

KBCraig

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I must disagree. I suggest you read McDonald v. City of Chicago, Ill., 561 US 742 - Supreme Court 2010. McDonald explains the 2A is a civil right and is actually contained in the Fourteenth Amendment.
I'm not sure what you're disagreeing with.

The 1A is also a civil right incorporated by 14A, but that doesn't mean you are free to set up your soapbox in Walmart. It doesn't mean that you can practice Santeria in a Methodist church (private property that invites the public).

Both are rights, but the property owner also has the right to exclude their practice.

In this case, it also means that the owner of an apartment complex doesn't have to allow exercise of either 2A or 1A rights in common areas.
 

color of law

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I'm not sure what you're disagreeing with.

The 1A is also a civil right incorporated by 14A, but that doesn't mean you are free to set up your soapbox in Walmart. It doesn't mean that you can practice Santeria in a Methodist church (private property that invites the public).

Both are rights, but the property owner also has the right to exclude their practice.

In this case, it also means that the owner of an apartment complex doesn't have to allow exercise of either 2A or 1A rights in common areas.
Don't conflate places that sell goods or services with places of accommodations (and not all places of accommodations qualify). Ingress and egress to an abode cannot be generally restricted. Based on your understanding explanation a landlord could exclude Jews, blacks and women.
 
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