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Cross-draw/cross-body carry?

PonderingMarmoset

New member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
10
I've been considering cross-draw OWB carry lately. I have a S&W SD9VE (a full frame gun) and I normally carry it in a Blackhawk OWB kydex paddle retention holster. That holster, I really like. So just to try cross-dawr carry (I'll call it CDC from now on), I removed the paddle and adjusted the cant way forward, then carried the gun on my left side for the day. It rides to the outside and a bit away from the body, same as when I wear it onmy dominant side. I still wore it centered on the side of my hip and not slid arond towards the front. I made sure I could draw it easily and quickly enough, and had no problems there. It didn't especially feel any different, but it did offer to two distinct advantages over strong-side carry: First, I could draw it when seated in a car. Where I live, that's a very good idea. The other is that I didn't have to be quite as paranoid about watching my right flank or my 3:00-6:00 much anymore. If someone was going to try and snatch it, I;d at least have them in front of me when they tried, allowing me more time to react. Other than that, I ask the room if you've had any experiences or preferences regarding CDC. Do any possible disadvantages outweigh the advantages? Does LE teach such a carry mode to their officers anymore?

Fwiw, yes it's a retention holster, but what everyone misunderstands about retention holsters is that they are not....NOT, believe it or not, designed to keep your gun from being snatched. They don't work well enough in that respect to make that claim. Think about it, a retention holster is not that tough to snatch a gun out of anyway, though manufacturers would like you to think that. It's as easy for someone to press that release button during a from-behind snatch as it is for you to do it when drawing. The real reason they were designed and exist is to keep the gun in the holster in case you get knocked over or something to that effect.
 

Firearms Iinstuctor

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
3,345
Location
northern wis
After 50 years of carrying handguns the only cross draw holsters I use are shoulder and chest rigs.

Why because that works for me. Mainly while carrying a back pack and for larger handguns while hunting.

What level of retention are you using.

As far as retention holsters I have used many. Are they prefect no. Do they help yes. There are some you are not pulling the firearm out back wards no matter how hard you try. Some even if you hit the release button they well jam up the draw as to make it really hard.

When trying to draw the hand gun at a different angle.

They also help retain ones firearm when doing hard physical activity.


Situational awareness no mater what holster you have or where it is located is very important.
 

PonderingMarmoset

New member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
10
After 50 years of carrying handguns the only cross draw holsters I use are shoulder and chest rigs.

Why because that works for me. Mainly while carrying a back pack and for larger handguns while hunting.

What level of retention are you using.

As far as retention holsters I have used many. Are they prefect no. Do they help yes. There are some you are not pulling the firearm out back wards no matter how hard you try. Some even if you hit the release button they well jam up the draw as to make it really hard.

When trying to draw the hand gun at a different angle.

They also help retain ones firearm when doing hard physical activity.


Situational awareness no mater what holster you have or where it is located is very important.
Thank you for the reply. And I absolutely agree with you about situational awareness! Unfortunately, most people's idea of what's dangerous and what's not comes from watching too much COPS, making their so-called "awareness" useless. The rest walk around hopelessly deluded, thinking, it would seem, their best defense is to walk around thinking it can't happen to them. I was ready for it, and when it it DID happen to me, I had to shoot three hoodie-clad "youths" who one night approached me and put a gun in my face looking to rob me. Well, I was suddenly looking to shoot them in self defense. I guess it just wasn't their lucky day. Completely justified shooting, the cops didn't even think of pressing charges or arresting me. But that was because I'd educated myself in when it's necessary to use a gun and when it's not, where threats can come from, and how to handle multiple attackers. My awareness was on point that night, but you can't look into every dark corner and crevice of a poorly lit apartment complex, even with a Streamlight like mine.
 

PonderingMarmoset

New member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
10
And situational awareness can never be 100% of the time. When you least expect it........
To those who may not read my reply to your next post, it happened to me, but I was on alert at the time and had the mindframe of expecting it alright, so although their approach was sudden, i was able to react in time. They went straight to surgery while the cops and I joked around and ate McDs-their treat!-off the hood of one of their cars while the evidence team worked the scene. "Now THIS is the kind of report was LIKE to make!"
 
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