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Can a Presidential Executive Order...

Difdi

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
990
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA
...amend the U.S. constitution? Or a state constitution?

I suspect that it can't, because otherwise there would be no amendment process built into the constitution, the founders would just have directed Congress to petition that the President to do it.
 

gogodawgs

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Oct 25, 2009
Messages
5,675
Location
Federal Way, Washington, USA
...amend the U.S. constitution? Or a state constitution?

I suspect that it can't, because otherwise there would be no amendment process built into the constitution, the founders would just have directed Congress to petition that the President to do it.

No.

Basically an EO can adjust the rules/policy under a current law passed by congress. In general it applies to federal employees and/or federal property only.
 

Nightwing

New member
Joined
Aug 12, 2012
Messages
9
Location
Spokane
"United States Presidents issue executive orders to help officers and agencies of the executive branch manage the operations within the federal government itself"

"Although there is no constitutional provision or statute that explicitly permits executive orders, there is a vague grant of "executive power" given in Article II, Section 1, Clause 1 of the Constitution, and furthered by the declaration "take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed" made in Article II, Section 3, Clause 5. Most executive orders use these Constitutional reasonings as the authorization allowing for their issuance to be justified as part of the President's sworn duties,[2] the intent being to help direct officers of the U.S. Executive carry out their delegated duties as well as the normal operations of the federal government"

Wikipedia.org
 
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