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Ditch Common Law & Constitution on cultural grounds?

Ghost1958

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
660
Location
Kentucky
I'll have to respectfully disagree.

There is a huge quiet, majority that just wants gov to respect their rights, do the job it's constitutionally supposed to do, and leave them alone to live in peace.

Seems that is too much to ask.
 

since9

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
6,963
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
Given a choice, most people seek more "power".
That's a serious misnomer. the vast majority of people seek more autonomy, mastery, and purpose, but not power. Countless studies confirm this, including a highly regarded joint study done by MIT and the Carnegie-Mellon institute.

Only a small percentage of people actually seek power, and having met a number of them, I can assure you they're not only not very well liked, but many of them have some serious flaws in their thinking, as well.

By contrast, good leaders don't seek power, but they do accept additional responsibility after having proven themselves capable over time.

 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
7,541
Location
here nc
That's a serious misnomer. the vast majority of people seek more autonomy, mastery, and purpose, but not power. Countless studies confirm this, including a highly regarded joint study done by MIT and the Carnegie-Mellon institute.

Only a small percentage of people actually seek power, and having met a number of them, I can assure you they're not only not very well liked, but many of them have some serious flaws in their thinking, as well.

By contrast, good leaders don't seek power, but they do accept additional responsibility after having proven themselves capable over time.

Video snipped...
Since9 when you pull a snippet completely out of the middle of the conversational thread and then misinterpret that snippet to post the nonsense and video above...

Good job!
 

Ghost1958

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
660
Location
Kentucky
That's a serious misnomer. the vast majority of people seek more autonomy, mastery, and purpose, but not power. Countless studies confirm this, including a highly regarded joint study done by MIT and the Carnegie-Mellon institute.

Only a small percentage of people actually seek power, and having met a number of them, I can assure you they're not only not very well liked, but many of them have some serious flaws in their thinking, as well.

By contrast, good leaders don't seek power, but they do accept additional responsibility after having proven themselves capable over time.

With a few exceptions nobody gets to be a "leader " but that they seek the power that goes with the position.

Studies only prove what the egg heads doing them want them to prove.
 

eye95

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
13,539
Location
Fairborn, Ohio, USA
I disagree. Some people become leaders because their position grants them authority. Some people become leaders simply because others learn to trust their judgment.

People in the former category usually take years to learn to lead, rather than to boss. Some never do. People in the latter category are already leaders, and will likely never be bosses, even if their position gives them authority.

Bosses tend to seek power. Leaders empower the people whom they lead.
 

color of law

Accomplished Advocate
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
4,512
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
I disagree. Some people become leaders because their position grants them authority. Some people become leaders simply because others learn to trust their judgment.

People in the former category usually take years to learn to lead, rather than to boss. Some never do. People in the latter category are already leaders, and will likely never be bosses, even if their position gives them authority.

Bosses tend to seek power. Leaders empower the people whom they lead.
I generally agree with your statement except for the first sentence. Just because someone is granted authority does not make them a leader. A tyrant maybe, but not a leader. Most elected officials are elected to positions of authority, but that does not make them leaders, not even some. I don't consider "some" to rise to the level of infinitesimal.
 

HP995

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2012
Messages
728
Location
MO, USA
That's a serious misnomer. the vast majority of people seek more autonomy, mastery, and purpose, but not power. Countless studies confirm this, including a highly regarded joint study done by MIT and the Carnegie-Mellon institute.

Only a small percentage of people actually seek power, and having met a number of them, I can assure you they're not only not very well liked, but many of them have some serious flaws in their thinking, as well.
I'm a fan of Since9 but in this case I differ. People do seek power and my life experience (unfortunately) backs it up. Power, control along with money and gain - people are greedy and desperate. I look like a nice guy - I am a nice guy, plus some physical health problems from early on - and it's just like a magnet, so many people think they can take advantage, bully, or just disdain. Maybe because the world is competitive and people try to compete. They attack wherever they sense weakness or opportunity, and even though their instincts sometimes get them in trouble, and sometimes totally irrelevant and no possible gain for them, they still act on those feelings. And the workplace nowadays - whew! People trying to use any kinds of tricks and friends/corruption to gain control and move higher when they don't have the skills. Politics, military, social issues, home life, the line at the grocery store - I see a struggle for power and control wherever I look.
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
7,541
Location
here nc
HP995, for a bit of insight might i suggest you seek out and review Peter Drucker, the acknowledged “father of modern management” & organizational mgmt, tomes. https://www.asme.org/career-education/articles/leadership-skills/peter-druckers-principles-total-life


Also mightnview the business concept called The Peter Principle by Lawerence Peter, PhD,
 

since9

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
6,963
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
I disagree. Some people become leaders because their position grants them authority. Some people become leaders simply because others learn to trust their judgment.

People in the former category usually take years to learn to lead, rather than to boss. Some never do. People in the latter category are already leaders, and will likely never be bosses, even if their position gives them authority.

Bosses tend to seek power. Leaders empower the people whom they lead.
I said, "good leaders don't seek power, but they do accept additional responsibility after having proven themselves capable over time.
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
7,541
Location
here nc
Maybe not...according to his profile he logged in yesterday 0725 forum standard time

Go click on his name and it shows the last time eye95 logged in?
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
7,541
Location
here nc
Since9 it is so pleasant to watch as you engage in the act of duplicity....so refreshing actually as it causes members to rightfully to wonder...

Please keep proving my daddy’s philosophy about folk...they will do something to prove that they really are...
 
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